Coaches Information

Below is information, practice tips, and training ideas for coaches of all age groups.

Do Not Be THAT Coach - Handball Guidelines

Do you yell "HANDBALL!" or "COME ON REF!" every time the ball hits an arm? Do you turn to your parents/sideline, throwing up your arms making comments about the ref's eyesight or competence, or saying things like "How did he NOT see that?"? or "He must be watching a different game to the one I am watching?"?

Click HERE to read an excellent article on the misunderstood rule that is 'Handball'.

Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 4:15 PM
Do Not Be THAT Coach - Cut Out The Lectures

In all modern soccer coaching courses we stress 'No Lines, No Laps, No Lectures'.

Do not be THAT coach.

If your practice sessions consist of lengthy lectures, if your pre-game and 1/2 time talks are long and ineffective, if after every game your routine is a circle of entrapped players, sitting with heads bowed as you pontificate and gesticulate while telling the players everything they did 'wrong', then please click LECTURES to read the excellent article 'Lecture Them Not'

Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 8:31 AM
Do Not Be THAT Coach - Running Laps

In all modern soccer coaching courses we stress 'No Lines, No Laps, No Lectures'.

Do not be THAT coach.
If you are sending your players to run multiple laps at every practice for:
-Warm-up
-Conditioning
-Punishment
-Stamina
-Discipline
then please click LAPS to read the excellent article titled 'Soccer Conditioning Running Laps'

Quote:
"A great pianist doesn't run around the piano or do push-ups with the tops of his fingers. To be great, he plays the piano"

Jose Mourinho


Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 8:51 AM
Do Not Be THAT Coach - Sideline Behavior

Do not be THAT coach.

Do you return from games hoarse from shouting? Do you, your assistant or the parents on the sideline regularly shout/yell at the referee, your own players and/or your opponents?
If so please click RESPECT to view the excellent video clip 'Ray Calls for Respect' from the English F.A.

Remember your game day responsibility consists purely of providing technical and tactical instruction from the confines of the technical area. As the head coach you are responsible for the behavior of yourself, your assistant(s) and your sideline.

Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 8:51 AM
Do Not Be THAT Coach - Referees and Laws of the Game

As soon as the whistle blows to start the game, does your personality change? Do you fly off the handle when the ref misses a call? Do your veins start to bulge when a 'clear' offside call is not called? Does the ref have to come over to tell you to calm down? At half time and full time instead of talking to your players, do you make a beeline for the ref to discuss certain calls he made?
Do you, your assistant and your sideline/parents yell things like "Come on Ref", "Call it both ways", "Where's the call"?
Do you blame the ref for games your team loses?

Click on the attachment below to read the excellent article "Referees and the Laws of the Game - An Introduction for Coaches". Please read this to better understand the relationship all coaches need to have with the referees.

Remember your game day responsibility consists purely of providing technical and tactical instruction from the confines of the technical area. As the head coach you are responsible for the behavior of yourself, your assistant(s) and your sideline.

File: Referees_from_National_D_Manual.pdf

Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 8:48 AM
Do not be THAT Coach - Yelling at Players

Do not be THAT coach.

As a coach or trainer it is your job to provide technical and tactical information to your players in a safe and enjoyable environment. It is NEVER acceptable to yell, belittle or demean players at practice or games.
Please click YELLING AT PLAYERS and spend five minutes viewing this excellent video clip by Dr. Alan Goldberg, an internationally known sports psychology consultant, whose work is referenced in many Youth coaching courses.

Jim Bonwell
1/15/21 8:51 AM
Avoid Blowout Scores

Blowout scorelines are no fun for either team.
The winning coach is often unfairly accused of unsportsmanlike conduct, running up the score, stacking the team with ringers etc. etc.

What to do to avoid being put in this situation?
Have a "blowout plan", which should include discussing PRIOR to the game what to do once a blowout is likely.
Explain very clearly to the players that they must play the game with one or more of the following restrictions - these are examples but you can have your own:


- Get behind the defenders and cross laterally, or back to a team mate, before a shot can be taken.
- The only shots on goal MUST be from outside the penalty area
- Only one player is allowed to score (the player who has never scored)
- Put your top scorer in as goalkeeper
- Play a player down

It doesn't matter what the plan is, but make sure the players know and understand what you are doing and why you are doing it.

Do NOT play keep-away - this is more humiliating than running up the score
Do NOT yell "don't score" in a voice loud enough for the opponents/coach/parents to hear
Do NOT switch your defenders and attackers and expect this to solve the problem. Typically the defenders, who are not used to attacking, take great delight in scoring . . . making the situation worse.

What we are looking for is a good faith attempt on your part to avoid running up the score and embarrassing the other team. If you do that and can turn 12-0 into 7-0 then you are doing your part.

Jim Bonwell
9/8/21 4:50 PM
Avoid Getting Blown Out

If your team is conceding a lot of goals each game, it is time to work on your defense at practice and to have some game day plans to reduce the number of goals your team is conceding.

The following link gives some basic defending tips.
Click Defending Tips

Practice
Here are a couple of videos for first defender and second defender work.

Click Defending Video
Click Second Defender Video

Suggestions for Game Day
1) Instead of having your best players playing forward (where they stand on the 1/2 way line NEVER getting the ball), have them play defense or midfield
2) Man mark the opponent's best player with your strongest/fastest player, especially if this one strong player is scoring all the goals.
3) Stress that when the other team has the ball EVERY PLAYER is a defender
4) Make sure there are not huge gaps between each defender
5) Make sure there are not huge gaps between your defenders and your mids
6) Spread out when attacking but compact when defending
7) Closest player to the ball pressures. 2nd defender supports
8) If none of this works drop another forward back and play with an extra defender

Additional Suggestions
Watch a professional soccer game on TV. Watch the defenders and see what they do.
After your game on Saturdays, stay and watch the next game. See how other coaches have their defenders play.
Ask another coach to help you at practice.

Watch the following clips on Defensive Strategy STRATEGY to see how defenses should move.

Jim Bonwell
9/8/21 4:53 PM